It’s Fude Nib Time!

A little over two years ago my friend “M” sent me a package. Inside was a gorgeous and ornate fountain pen.

My initial thoughts on this pen was how wet and how broad this fude nib was! At that time I was into Extra Fine and Fine nib fountain pens. As you can imagine I was thrilled, but also a bit curious about this nib.

The Fude nib or bent nib

I’ve inked and tried this pen a few times. Initially, I found the pen to be quite slender. I think this is the skinniest fountain pen I have in my collection.

Platinum Prefounte, Duke Ruby, & Platinum Preppy

The pen weighs about 35 grams. The cap and body appears to be made of brass with a black lacquer finish. It’s a snap-cap pen which I prefer to use for my artwork as I can quickly remove the cap and start sketching.

It took some time for me to really appreciate what a fude nib can do. I follow a few artists on their creative adventures and found they keep a fude nib pen in their art bag.

With renewed interest, I pulled out my Duke pen and filled it with Smokescreen. I was feeling a bit creative and wanted to use this fountain pen to sketch with. I left my pencils and permanent fine tip pens on my studio desk. I went outside with my sketchbook and my fude fountain pen filled with ink and started sketching.

It took me about 15 minutes to complete this piece. This turned out to be a loose sketch as the Smokescreen ink with the fude nib had no issues laying down color on my paper. I literally went with the flow in my sketch.

I’m enjoying the broad strokes this pen creates. The line thickness reminds me of my TWSBI stub nibs. This pen can also create fine lines when I hold the pen between 45 to 90 degrees over the paper. The line is even finer when I turn the nib upside down and write with it.

Here’s my writing sample and a look at the different line variations this pen can produce.

At around a 40 degree angle or less, the line width reminds me of a Stub 1.1 nib. At 45 degrees and higher, the line width gets narrower and close to a Fine nib. At a slightly less than 90 degree angle, the line reminds me of an Extra Fine nib. When I turn the nib upside down, it produces a consistent and slightly narrower Extra Fine line.

There is a learning curve to handling this pen. For me, I had to be cognizant of how I was holding the pen in my hand. For sketching, I found if I held the pen like a paint brush (around the top of the section) I could control the stroke sizes easier. The key here was holding the pen loosely. The other thing I had to think about is what angle the pen & nib was over the paper. Did I want to create a broad stroke or a fine line? After a few inky refills and some practice sessions, I finally became one with this pen.

Overall, this is a smooth nib to write and sketch with. It’s a sturdy nib and well made. The smooth grip area has a slightly textured feel that I hardly notice in my hand. It does keep my fingers from sliding down the section.

Now that I understand the Fude nib’s capabilities, I’m having a blast sketching and writing with this pen.

The decorative filigree and a man-made ruby bling on the cap

Thank you “M” for introducing me to this wonderful and gorgeous fountain pen. Sorry it took so long for me to really appreciate how well this pen sketches and writes.

Note: I have an inexpensive Sailor Fude nib pen arriving soon. I am looking forward to seeing how this light weight pen performs in my sketching adventures and how it compares to the Duke Fude pen. Stay tuned!

Pen: Duke Ruby with Fude nib

Ink: Robert Oster Smokescreen

Paper: Rhodia

Journal: Canson Artist Mixed Media sketchbook

4 thoughts on “It’s Fude Nib Time!”

  1. I love my fude nib pens! My cheap green Sailor is my favorite nib, although I dont like the cap. But it draws and draws. The Sailor Jentle ink that comes with it washes nicely. The Duke is probably my next favorite, it has a very nice nib, but dries out quickly. I also have a Hong Dian with a fude nib, but it makes a finer line, even at its broadest. I even have a couple of super cheap Hero fude pens, they write and draw well for a 3$ pen, but they dont hold much ink and the squeeze filling mechanism is horrible. there is a boatload of fun with a fude nib, I am easily entertained.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Lora….thank you for sharing your fude nib experiences and information on the other fude nib brands available. I’m enjoying my Duke pen as the nib is really smooth. I just received my Sailor fude pens: a pink pen (fude de mannen) with 40 degree angle nib and a black Sailor Profit with a 55 degree angle nib. Will try them out later this week. I am having too much fun! 😊

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  2. Thank you very much for your post about using a Fude pen. I have one but never knew what to do with it! Going to get it out and do some practice strokes…loved that R.Oster ink you used too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are so welcome! I also have been playing with two Sailor versions of the Fude nib. I hope to get a review post done sometime this month. That RO Smokescreen is a gorgeous ink color to sketch with. Thank you for your comments. 😊

      Like

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