Anderillium Inks – Cephalopod Series

For this blog post I will be covering the remaining eight ink colors from Anderillium Inks and representing their Cephalopod series. A few of their bright ink colors brought a smile to my face. Here’s my writing samples from this series where I wrote a brief summary about the ink or cephalopod’s name.

Here are my swatch cards representing the eight ink colors. You can see some sheen in a few of the colors.

Here’s some inky swatches I found from my swatch card collection that came close to or matched the Anderillium Ink colors.

Flapjack Octopus Orange is a bright orange ink color with some lovely shading. I have a handful of orange ink colors and these two, Damili and Shoreline Gold, were the closest in color.

Vampire Squid Red is a wonderful medium red ink color with a bit of gold sheen. If I did not already have Sushi and Tassie Salmon, I would probably get a bottle of this ink color.

Bobtail Squid Green is in between Subline and Green Lime and leans more towards Green Lime.

Spiral Green is a lovely bright medium green ink color with a tiny bit of dark red sheen along the edges. I was able to get a close match with Green Green and Midori.

Blue Ringed Octopus is a tiny bit darker than Australian Opal Blue and Australian Sky Blue. It shows a bit of red sheen around the edges.

Flying Squid Blue is a close match to Soda Pop Blue and Asa Blue. It’s a medium blue ink with a bit of red sheen and is similar to Soda Pop Blue.

Collosal Squid Dark is a unique ink color with some black sheen. It’s a medium dark teal green color and quite different from Eroded Bronze and Velvet Storm.

Cuttlefish Brown is a lovely medium brown ink color and is a close match between Melon Tea and Bronze. Cuttlefish has some black sheen which makes it look like a dark brown ink color in my writing sample.

Majority of the colors in this Cephalopod series are very similar to the colors I already have in my inky collection. They appear to be moderately wet inks. The bright colors are very appealing and I would not hesitate to use them in my artwork.

Inks: Anderillium Inks Cephalopod Series

Ink Journal: GLP Creations The Author Tomoe River Paper 68gsm

Anderillium Inks – Avian Series

I have fallen behind in my inky reviews. I need to play catch up and I will be writing future posts that will include several ink colors from the same ink manufacturer. So, let me continue with the Anderillium Inks samples I received a few months ago.

At the start of my Anderillium ink reviews, I talked about the following four inky colors from their Avian series.

Here’s a close up of my swatch cards.

I’ve included a link for each of the color I’ve already posted on my blog: Indigo Blue Bunting, Kingfisher Green, Roseate Spoonbill Pink, and Pompadour Cotinga Burgundy.

The next four colors in their Avian series includes a purple, grey, yellow, and a black ink color.

The purple, grey, and black colors appear to be somewhat dry inks.

I pulled out my swatch cards to see what other ink colors came close to the Anderillium colors. For Purple Gallinule, Night Shade and Dragon’s Night were the closest colors I had.

Shoebill Stork Grey is a basic flat gray ink color especially when compared to Australian Opal Gray and Earl Grey.

Gold Finch Yellow is a beautiful and bright yellow color with a bit of orange sheen. It’s a brighter than Yellow Sunrise or Aussie Gold.

Common Loon Black is more of a dark gray ink color when compared to a black ink like Shogun.

The Shoebill Stork Grey and the Common Loon Black appear to be drier inks compared to the other colors in this series.

I like their Indigo Bunting Blue, Kingfisher Green, Roseate Spoonbill Pink, Pompadour Cotinga Burgundy, and Goldfinch Yellow. I like the brighter colors and I could see using them in my pen & ink artwork. The other three colors are bit a flat and less interesting to use in my artwork.

For journaling and writing, I think all the inks write well and are readable.

I’ll be back with the remaining inky colors from Anderillium’s Cephalopod series. Stay tuned.

Inks: Anderillium Inks Avian Series

Ink Journal: GLP Creations The Author Tomoe River Paper 68gsm

Swatch Card for September

I’ve been pulling out my fountain pens filled with shimmering inks and cleaning them out. A few have been in use since May and I thought it was time to rotate the colors out and try some new inks.

I used a 4″x6″ watercolor paper post card to create my swatch card. So far, this includes 19 inky colors I am currently using for this month. These inky colors reside in my TWSBIs, Pilot, Opus 88, Nahvalur, and Indy pens. That includes about a dozen TWSBI GOs.

I am still missing a few colors like a golden yellow which I will add to my currently inked collection in the next day or so.

I keep my swatch card with me in my art bag along with my fountain pens and inks. There are times when I forget what inky colors I have ready to go for my sketches or when I’m trying to find the right inky shade for a particular sketch.

Post Card: Tumuarta Watercolor Post Card 4″x6″ 140lb/300gsm cold press

Pens: turnt pen co “Grisham 13” in Peach Agate (Bob Dupras) with Fine nib. Pilot Custom 742 with Soft Fine <SF> nib. Nahvalur Original Plus in Melacara Purple with Stub nib.

Dominant Industry Inks

I came across Dominant Industry Inks a few weeks ago when I kept seeing two lovely ink colors appear on my social media feed.

Dominant Industry inks is based in South Korea. They designed the inks for their unique colors and effects. Their 25ml bottles are packaged in a cardboard box and includes a cloth dust bag and a single use pipette.

The heavy and unique shaped bottles look lovely sitting on my desk.

Strangely, I could not find a company website to get more details about their inks or any information about the company.

After looking at all the available ink colors, I narrowed down my choices to two Pearl ink colors called Sunset and Autumn Forest.

The Sunset ink is an unusual dusty purple ink that leans a bit towards rose. There are pink and blue undertone colors along with a rose gold shimmer. I feel as though the shimmers makes the purple ink lean a bit more towards pink.

I went through my ink swatches and the colors that came close to Sunset was Robert Oster Velvet Crush and Taccia Murasaki.

The Autumn Forest ink color is a unique ink color. I say that as it depends on what paper you use this ink on. On my swatch card, the ink appears to be a medium gray ink color. This ink has a pink and a bit of blue undertone colors as well as rose gold shimmer. Depending on the lighting, the ink color could also be considered gray-brown.

It’s interesting to look at other people’s swatches and see some green in their ink. I do not see any green at all.

I also went through my ink swatches to see what other colors I have that come close to Autumn Forest. I came up with a winner. Diamine Ash from the Red Inkvent Calendar. It’s very close match minus the shimmering particles.

The colors are gorgeous in my inky washes. For journal writing, I will use the inks in my broader nib pens. I prefer Autumn Forest over Sunset for readability. Sunset is a bit too light for me to write with.

Inks: Dominant Industry Sunset and Autumn Forest

Pens: Franklin-Christoph #31 Candystone with HPS Flex EF nib. Lamy LX Marron with Stub 1.1 nib.

Journals: GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm. Stalogy B6 Editor’s Series 365.

Colorverse Butterfly Nebula/NGC 6302 – Special Edition Ink!

I was late to the show with this ink color. One of my workshop attendees had shared an inky swatch she had from the Colorverse table. It was so mesmerizing to see the lovely shimmers. You know how I love a good shimmering ink and especially one from Colorverse.

After my workshops were finished for the weekend, I immediately went to the Luxury Brands table to find this lovely shimmering ink. It was sold out! All I could do was look at the lovely swatch they had on their table. I was given some information and was told they would be releasing it to the local retailers in a few weeks.

Fast forward to now and I have this lovely ink in my hands. I could not resist turning my bottle of Butterfly Nebula to see what shimmering colors would appear.

Do you see the interesting colors inside my bottle?

It looks like purple shimmers inside the bottle. When I roll the bottle to the other side, the shimmers look pink.

This Colorverse Butterfly Nebula debuted at the 2022 DC Pen Show. It’s so special that this is the first time Colorverse has released a glistening ink in a large 65ml bottle. Colorverse is also the first ink company to be put on the cover of the Pen World Magazine.

The Butterfly Nebula is packaged with the Colorverse NGC 6302 in a 15ml bottle.

I looked through my swatch cards to see if I had something similar to NGC 6302. The two colors that came close were Sydney Darling Harbour and Hail Storm. The Colorverse NGC 6302 a dusty green ink color with blue & beige underlying colors.

For Butterfly Nebula, the closest color I had was Summer Storm which happens to be much darker and leans a bit more towards pink. I would call Butterfly Nebula a dusty periwinkle (lavender blue) ink color.

This ink shows pink shimmers on my swatch card.

I ended up creating two swatches for this ink. The first one on the left came out so light in color, I ended up writing over the ink name twice. For the second swatch on the right, I let the ink settle a bit in the bottle before dipping my pens. I was able to capture a darker ink color. Once the swatch dried, I was happy to see a some green appear on the card.

Here’s another look at the two ink colors on my Stalogy paper. Now, the Butterfly Nebula is showing some green along with some blue colors as well as the pink shimmers. It’s also the same colors shown in my bottle (2nd picture above).

Both ink colors have interesting personalities and are unique compared to other inks I have in my collection.

I was surprised how light the Nebula Butterfly ink color was compared to what I saw at the pen show. I wish it was a tad bit darker for my writing purposes. The writing samples on my swatch cards and on my Stalogy paper were written with a JoWo #6 Fine nib. I will definitely try this ink in one of my pens with a stub nib.

Inks: Colorverse Butterfly Nebula (65ml) and NGC 6302 (15ml) from Federalist Pens and Paper

Workshop Prompt – Shapes

In my workshops we created basic shapes for our warm up exercises. To activate our muscle memory. Our shapes will look flat which is okay for our warm up exercises.

Remember: no “death grips” and try to move your arm while sketching instead of just using your hand. I mentioned in my handout that if you just use your hand, you will start to feel some tightness in your grip and you may feel a cramp starting to develop in your hand. Remember to relax while you sketch.

Many of you wanted to see more of my sketches, my layouts, and my writing. Here is the most recent sketch I created while I was sitting at my studio desk. I had gathered round objects to create my two page spread.

Notice the cast shadows and the colors I used under my objects

Here are a few of my objects that I used in my sketches. This view is looking top down and off to the side.

Here I have my objects lined up on my desk with a side view of my inky bottles. Sorry my lovely miniature vase was too round to sit sideways.

My challenge is for you to look through your inky bottle collection. Pick out three (3) bottles of your favorite ink brands and try sketching them from the top down view and then from the side view (if possible).

Use your pencil to create the outline first and then sketch what details you like. Do not erase until you have all the lines created (good & bad). Take your permanent pen and redraw the lines you want to keep. Go back and erase the bad lines.

Use your fountain pens and inks to create your washes. Remember to keep the white of your paper to represent the highlights on your objects. If you need to make certain areas of your object darker, make sure your first layer is dry before adding more color to your object.

Most important thing to remember is have fun!

If you have any questions, you know where to find me. ūüėä

Pompadour Cotinga Burgundy – Anderillium Ink

This is a lovely burgundy ink color from Anderillum Ink. I like this ink color for writing in my journal and for my artwork. There’s a bit of familiarity with this color.

This ink color has a bit of shading and is quite lovely.

When I first saw this ink color, I immediately thought of Raspberry Rose and Black Tongue Spider Orchid. This ink color falls somewhere in between the two colors.

I misspelled the ink name on my swatch card. It should be Cotinga. The ink shows a bit of green sheen.

I like this inky color a lot. It’s not too rosy and not too pinky. I have to say it’s just right.

Ink: Anderillium Inks Pompadour Cotinga Burgundy

Pen: Stainless Steel Kakimori nib in a nib holder by River City Pen Company

Papers: Canson Mixed Media. GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm

Roseate Spoonbill Pink – Anderillium Inks

I enjoy using pinky ink colors in my fountain pens. I tend to lean towards the rosy pink colors for writing and for sketching.

I took my sample vial of Roseate Spoonbill Pink and started to play with this color. As you can imagine, I was a bit surprised to see how bright this pink was.

This pink color is so bright it makes my writing feel bright and cheery on the paper.

I knew I did not have a similar ink color to Roseate Spoonbill, but I went ahead and flipped through my swatch cards to see what colors would come close to this bright pink color. Here are my rosy pink swatches with shimmers compared to the Anderillium ink color.

Roseate Spoonbill Pink has a bright gold sheen.

This Anderillium ink is a bright pink ink color. Almost neon pink. It has a lovely golden yellow sheen. This ink produces a lovely wash of color when used with water.

This color has grown on me. I think this would be beautiful to use as an ink wash for floral artwork. It’s also a nice bright and bold color for writing.

Ink: Anderillium Ink Roseate Spoonbill Pink

Pen: Stainless Steel Kakimori nib in a River City Pen Company nib holder

Papers: Canson Mixed Media. GLP Creations The Author Tomoe River Paper 68gsm

FWP Roaring Patina Black

For the last three years, I’ve been collecting fountain pen inks in every imaginable color except for black. Let me clarify and say except for the Platinum Carbon ink which is a permanent ink color. I’m talking about dye based inks.

I saw a few swatches and writing samples on my social media feed and fell for this black shimmering ink color from Ferris Wheel Press. I saw lots of golden shimmers and a bright red sheen. In the back of my mind, there was something familiar about this ink color that I could not put my finger on.

My inky swatch completely dry. Lots of sheen and shimmer!

I was patiently waiting two weeks for my Ferris Wheel Press ink to arrive. It was in stock and I was hoping to get it within 2-3 days after placing my order. Well, my online retailer had other plans and decided to hold my order until a few items I needed came back in stock. Seven days later, my package shipped. It made it’s way up the west coast and spent a lovely day in Anchorage, Alaska. Thank goodness someone saw it was going in the wrong direction and redirected my package. It took a few days to arrive at my local distribution area.

Once this nicely packaged bottle of ink arrived in my studio, I quickly created a swatch. While the ink was drying on my card, I could see swirls of gold sparkles. The red sheen appeared after my swatch started to dry. Oh my, this was so familiar. Then it hit me! I quickly flipped through my shimmering ink swatches and found another swatch sample that matched this Patina Roaring Black ink color. Personally, I think Diamine Tempest is closer to a blue black ink color.

Do you think they match?

If you remember from previous posts, I enjoyed Diamine Tempest so much that I placed it high on my wishlist to get a larger bottle. I can honestly say the two colors, Patina Roaring Black and Tempest, look exactly alike. It has the same golden shimmering particles. They both have a red sheen. This red sheen can be a bit deceiving as I can also see a lovely pink sheen at most angles. That includes both swatches. It could be the result of combining a red sheen and gold shimmer in the same ink.

I decided to add another swatch, Shogun, to the mix.

I’m happy I trusted my gut instinct and purchased my Shogun before Roaring Patina Black. Shogun is a beautiful black shimmering ink color and it’s been a joy to write and sketch with.

I need to fill one of my pens with Roaring Patina Black and spend a few days writing and sketching with this lovely ink color. I will post any new updates and findings on this blog post.

My FWP swatch still a bit damp

Inks: Ferris Wheel Press Roaring Patina Black. Diamine Tempest (Red Inkvent). Jacques Herbin Shogun.

Green Kingfisher Green – Anderillium Inks

Green Kingfisher Green reminds me of a medium olive green color. I can see several underlying colors which include light dusty gold and bright cyan blue. I’m thinking there’s another color, but won’t know for sure until I sketch with this gorgeous ink color.

This is another ink color I had a hard time photographing. The olive green color is a tad bit lighter than what my writing sample shows. There is some shading that shows up while writing with my TWSBI GO with medium nib.

It was not too hard to find comparable inky colors from my collection. They each have their own personalities especially when using different papers. You can see how my swatching process has changed over the years.

Another look at my sketch along with my swatch card together.

I had to pull out my watercolor paint swatches to help identify that tan/beige color that kept appearing in my artwork.

My Thoughts:

As I sketch more with fountain pen inks, I’m finding certain colors appeal to me more than others. If I had to choose a green color, I would gravitate more towards the olive green color.

This ink leans more towards the wet side. It’s not gushing wet (like Van Dieman’s Inks), but it’s also not dry.

I am having too much fun with this lovely olive green ink. I might put off the next ink color for a few days so I can write my TWSBI GO dry. Hahaha!

I’m adding this ink color to my wish list. Yes, I know I have other olive green ink colors in my collection for writing. I would get this for sketching. It has some unique qualities.

Look at the explosion of colors that appear when I add water to the inky splat on my paper towel. The blue is close to a light cyan blue color.

The ink is still damp and I can see remnants of olive green around the edges
The ink is dry and the golden orange color appears

Pen Used: TWSBI Go with Medium nib

Ink: Anderillium Green Kingfisher Green

Journals Used: Canson Artist Series Mix Media. GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm Dot Grid. Stillman & Birn Alpha.