FWP Roaring Patina Black

For the last three years, I’ve been collecting fountain pen inks in every imaginable color except for black. Let me clarify and say except for the Platinum Carbon ink which is a permanent ink color. I’m talking about dye based inks.

I saw a few swatches and writing samples on my social media feed and fell for this black shimmering ink color from Ferris Wheel Press. I saw lots of golden shimmers and a bright red sheen. In the back of my mind, there was something familiar about this ink color that I could not put my finger on.

My inky swatch completely dry. Lots of sheen and shimmer!

I was patiently waiting two weeks for my Ferris Wheel Press ink to arrive. It was in stock and I was hoping to get it within 2-3 days after placing my order. Well, my online retailer had other plans and decided to hold my order until a few items I needed came back in stock. Seven days later, my package shipped. It made it’s way up the west coast and spent a lovely day in Anchorage, Alaska. Thank goodness someone saw it was going in the wrong direction and redirected my package. It took a few days to arrive at my local distribution area.

Once this nicely packaged bottle of ink arrived in my studio, I quickly created a swatch. While the ink was drying on my card, I could see swirls of gold sparkles. The red sheen appeared after my swatch started to dry. Oh my, this was so familiar. Then it hit me! I quickly flipped through my shimmering ink swatches and found another swatch sample that matched this Patina Roaring Black ink color. Personally, I think Diamine Tempest is closer to a blue black ink color.

Do you think they match?

If you remember from previous posts, I enjoyed Diamine Tempest so much that I placed it high on my wishlist to get a larger bottle. I can honestly say the two colors, Patina Roaring Black and Tempest, look exactly alike. It has the same golden shimmering particles. They both have a red sheen. This red sheen can be a bit deceiving as I can also see a lovely pink sheen at most angles. That includes both swatches. It could be the result of combining a red sheen and gold shimmer in the same ink.

I decided to add another swatch, Shogun, to the mix.

I’m happy I trusted my gut instinct and purchased my Shogun before Roaring Patina Black. Shogun is a beautiful black shimmering ink color and it’s been a joy to write and sketch with.

I need to fill one of my pens with Roaring Patina Black and spend a few days writing and sketching with this lovely ink color. I will post any new updates and findings on this blog post.

My FWP swatch still a bit damp

Inks: Ferris Wheel Press Roaring Patina Black. Diamine Tempest (Red Inkvent). Jacques Herbin Shogun.

Green Kingfisher Green – Anderillium Inks

Green Kingfisher Green reminds me of a medium olive green color. I can see several underlying colors which include light dusty gold and bright cyan blue. I’m thinking there’s another color, but won’t know for sure until I sketch with this gorgeous ink color.

This is another ink color I had a hard time photographing. The olive green color is a tad bit lighter than what my writing sample shows. There is some shading that shows up while writing with my TWSBI GO with medium nib.

It was not too hard to find comparable inky colors from my collection. They each have their own personalities especially when using different papers. You can see how my swatching process has changed over the years.

Another look at my sketch along with my swatch card together.

I had to pull out my watercolor paint swatches to help identify that tan/beige color that kept appearing in my artwork.

My Thoughts:

As I sketch more with fountain pen inks, I’m finding certain colors appeal to me more than others. If I had to choose a green color, I would gravitate more towards the olive green color.

This ink leans more towards the wet side. It’s not gushing wet (like Van Dieman’s Inks), but it’s also not dry.

I am having too much fun with this lovely olive green ink. I might put off the next ink color for a few days so I can write my TWSBI GO dry. Hahaha!

I’m adding this ink color to my wish list. Yes, I know I have other olive green ink colors in my collection for writing. I would get this for sketching. It has some unique qualities.

Look at the explosion of colors that appear when I add water to the inky splat on my paper towel. The blue is close to a light cyan blue color.

The ink is still damp and I can see remnants of olive green around the edges
The ink is dry and the golden orange color appears

Pen Used: TWSBI Go with Medium nib

Ink: Anderillium Green Kingfisher Green

Journals Used: Canson Artist Series Mix Media. GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm Dot Grid. Stillman & Birn Alpha.

Indigo Bunting Blue – Anderillium Inks

A few weeks ago, I thought I was missing a color from the Anderillium samples I received. I initially swatched 15 inky colors. I checked the packing slip and I counted 16 sample vials.

This morning I took out my sample vials and placed them on my desk for a quick photo op. I looked inside the supposedly empty box and found the missing vial of ink stuck in between some bubble wrap. I now feel as though all is good in my world and I can now proceed to chat about the inks.

I quickly did a swatch of this (supposedly missing) ink and immediately enjoyed seeing this dusty blue color. A very calm and enjoyable color.

I did a quick sketch to see how well the ink interacts with water. It’s gorgeous!

Before I get too far into this fun adventure, I have to come up with a plan on how to best present the Anderillium inks on my blog. I think I will do a quick sketch and then follow up with a writing sample. If this sounds familiar it’s because I did a similar process for the Diamine Inkvent Calendar.

This ink color dries a bit lighter than what my writing sample shows

This ink has some lovely shading and no sheen.

I’m sure it will be helpful to include other swatch colors I have for comparisons.

Looks like this will work. Short and sweet, right?

My Thoughts: After using this ink for two days, I find I’m using this color for sketching. It’s a decent color for writing, but after looking back on the paragraphs I wrote I do wish the ink was a tad bit darker. It’s a lovely wet ink with lovely shading.

Pen Used: TWSBI Go with Medium nib

Ink: Anderillium Indigo Bunting Blue

Journals Used: Canson Artist Series Mix Media. GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm Dot Grid. Stillman & Birn Alpha.

A New (to me) Fountain Pen Ink Brand – Anderillium Inks

I’m always searching for and coming across fountain pen inks that I can use for both writing and sketching in my journals. I was elated to have an opportunity to try out a new-to-me brand of inks. The samples arrived at my studio desk and I immediately began swatching the colors.

This new-to-me inks are made by Anderillium Inks and they are based in Tampa, Florida. Their inks are handcrafted and inspired by nature. They have two inky offerings: Cephalopod and Avian. It appears I’m missing a color. No worries. I found the missing vial hidden in the bubble wrap. I will swatch the missing color later.

Look at the bright colors!

The Anderillium inks are hand made in their own laboratory. They do not use any animal products in their inks or in their packaging. They are passionate about protecting our oceans and our wildlife. They choose to use the most sustainable and environmentally friendly materials whenever possible.

Their inks are water based and are made only with chemicals that are safe for the environment. I was so happy to read about their inks and their passion in protecting the ocean and wildlife.

Over the next few weeks, I will be spending some quality time (writing & sketching) with each of the ink colors I have on hand and provide some thoughts about the inks in general. In the meantime, I have written a few notes to myself so I wouldn’t forget my initial thoughts. I will do my best to describe the color(s) I see and any inky qualities that stand out.

As I was flipping through the swatches I created, I found a few of the Anderillium ink colors unique enough to add to my wish list. There were also a few colors that appeared to be somewhat close to some of the colors I have in my inky collection.

My inky collection of fountain pen inks

I am looking forward to this fun adventure. Stay tuned.

Thank you Frank from Federalist Pens and Paper for providing the ink samples.

Inks: Anderillium Inks

Swatches: Col-o-ring Cards

Paper: Rhodia

Spring is Definitely in the Air with Opus 88

I was able to snag an Opus 88 fountain pen called Love in Bloom. I originally pre-ordered it with a Medium nib and received an email from the retailer that they had a Fine and a Broad nib available and could send it immediately. I shifted gears and went with a Fine nib.

Opus 88 Omar, Opus 88 Mini, & Lamy 2000

After a few days of delays which included waiting for my pen to be shipped, then delivered to wrong address, and finally received, I was able to fill my new pen with Summer Purple.

My Opus 88 is definitely a mini pen and measures about 4-5/8 inches or 117.3mm in length and weighs around 24grams. It’s a tiny bit shorter than my TWSBI Vac Mini, Pilot Stargazer, and Pilot Prera.

TWSBI Vac Mini, Pilot Stargazer, Opus 88 Mini, Sailor Pro Gear Haruzora, & Pilot Prera

After I checked the nib with a loupe, I had a gut feeling that this pen would have a dry writing experience. I originally filled my pen with Van Dieman’s Ink Parrot Fish (shimmering) and it immediately clogged my pen. That was a bad idea. I emptied the ink into a vial to reuse in another pen. I flushed my new pen with some water and went to Plan B and Summer Purple.

Summer Purple had been on my inky wishlist and I finally had a bottle sent to me a few weeks ago. Yes, it sat on my studio desk and patiently waited for a swatch to be made and the right pen to be filled.

Summer Purple is a gorgeous ink color. It’s a pinky-purple color with a lovely golden sheen. This color reminds me of the bright colored eggplant you would find in Asia and not the dark purple ones here in the US.

This pen and ink combination makes me very happy.

I have a good feeling that this ink will make its way into one of my TWSBI GOs and I’m looking forward to sketching with this gorgeous ink color.

The Opus 88 Mini does not post. Yes, I tried to post my pen and the cap flew off immediately. Some pen-folks may not enjoy writing with this short pen. In my hand, I can feel that it is a short and stubby pen. The tapered section is shorter than my Omar and holds a #5 JoWo nib. Personally, I would have preferred a #6 nib on this small sized pen.

It’s a cute mini pen. It’s a pocket pen. It’s a travel pen. It’s small enough to fit in most pen cases. It’s an eyedropper pen that holds a large amount of ink. It’s a pen that looks absolutely lovely on my desk. I’m sure there will be more mini pen designs in the near future.

Pen: Opus 88 Mini Pocket Pen in Love in Bloom (Endless Pens Exclusive 2022) with Fine nib

Ink: Kaweco Summer Purple

Paper: Rhodia

My Favorite Diamine Red Inkvent Calendar Colors

So I’ve been wanting to do a blog post about my favorite fountain pen inks from the Diamine Red Inkvent Calendar. When I think about my favorites, it’s because the ink color looks great in my writing journal and also looks great in my pen & ink artwork.

Top view of my ink swatches

It’s rare that I will have two pens filled with the same ink color. If I do, it’s because I want to write with it and I typically will write with an Extra Fine or Fine nib pen. You already know that I enjoy sketching with my TWSBI GOs with stub nibs and so one of them will get the same ink color. I enjoy using my stub nib pens for sketching as I can get two different line variations from one nib.

Slightly angled view of my swatches to show off the sheen and shimmers

One morning while I was sipping my coffee, I went through my ink swatches from the Red Inkvent Calendar. I was narrowing down my choices and came up with a list of my favorite colors. I read somewhere and saw pictures that Diamine was manufacturing big bottles of ink from their calendar. I think April is the magic month when we might see some of the colors. It’s always good to plan ahead and figure out the faves. Right?

I decided to put my favorite colors together for a group photo. I wanted to show how uniquely different the blue colors are next to each other.

My favorite 10 ink colors each have unique personalities and nine of them have shimmers. Black Ivy (no shimmers & lots of sheen) is lovely dark green ink color. When I use the ink in my pen & ink sketches, the ink changes towards a teal/turquoise color.

Here’s a slightly angled view to show off some of the ink’s characteristics better:

Here are the individual photos of my faves and in no particular order:

My 10 favorite colors shown in the above photo collage represents the colors I’ve used for both writing and sketching. I’ve been happy with the colors and how they look on a variety of papers I have used to write and sketch with. Most of the calendar colors spoke to me. Some colors shouted more than the others. Hahaha!

I’m almost certain that Vintage Copper will come in a larger bottle. That was a color I saw in one of Diamine’s picture. I had to zoom in closer and take off my glasses to see the labels.

I have to admit, this was the first time I spent some quality time with Diamine inks. I was happy to spend the last few months filling & testing their calendar inks in my collection of fountains pens and in my TWSBI GOs. It gave me a better appreciation for their ink’s quality and gorgeous colors.

In case you missed all the colors, here’s my sketch using all the Diamine inks from the calendar:

Inks: Diamine Red Inkvent Calendar.

Day #25: All the Best!

Inkvent Day #25: Diamine All the Best

This is Diamine’s 30ml bottle of inky wonderment. I feel as though I won a grand prize for getting through the last 25 days of inky madness. Oh my!

I was twirling this bottle around to see what inky characteristics to expect from the label. Nothing. Just the name of the color.

I can see some shimmering particulates. Looks like the same amount as in the tiny 12ml bottles.

I shake the bottle to disperse the shimmers. I know I may not get as much since this bottle holds more ink. I gave my bottle a good shake. Where did my shimmers go?

Okay. Let’s start by doing some breathing exercises.

Breathe in.

Breathe out.

Breathe in.

Breathe out.

Repeat two more times before scrolling further.

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.

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Here is All the Best! Oh my! Look at all of this inky craziness on my swatch card!

Here’s a close up. Remember to breath in and breathe out.

There’s a good amount of sheen in my writing sample.

Let’s look at my swatch card from another angle.

.

I can see the amazing sheen in my ink wash. There’s a tiny bit of shimmer there as well.

Al the Best is a dark magenta ink color. Initially, the magenta color seems to disappear off the page as the bright olive green sheen overtakes the ink’s color. The longer I write with this ink, the more the magenta color becomes more prevalent on my paper with less sheen showing. Oh and let’s not forget the purplish-blue shimmering particles that decides to show up every now and then. How’s that for a description of this unusual ink color?

This is the last ink color in my calendar and it’s also at the very top of my wish list for a larger bottle.

Ink: Diamine All the Best (shimmer & sheen)

Pens: Turnt Pen Co Primary Manipulation 4 with Franklin-Christoph Fine nib. Automatic pen.

Journal: GLP Creations with Tomoe River Paper (68gsm)

Paper: Grumbacher Mixed Media

Day #24: Yuletide and Oh My!

Inkvent Day #24: Diamine Yuletide

I enjoy turquoise and teal ink colors. It reminds me of the beautiful waters in the Caribbean. I also enjoy intense pink, bright coral, and eucalyptus/olive green colors.

When I saw the label color on the bottle I knew this was going to be another favorite color.

Diamine says this ink is a standard ink. It shows quite a bit of shading on my paper. My swatch card shows some interesting inky goodness.

So I had a funny thing happen to me. I picked up my Maiora fountain pen and proceeded to fill it with this ink. Uh-oh. I could not get the nib/feed/section into the bottle. My pen’s section was a bit thicker than the bottle’s opening. I had a “you’ve got to be kidding” moment with my pen. I untwisted my converter from the pen and dunked my converter into the bottle and filled it with ink. Mission accomplished. ūüėä

Okay, let’s get back to my inky observations.

There’s a bit of pinky sheen showing up on my swatch card. I’m trying to figure out if this ink is a teal or a turquoise color.

Here’s a close up of my writing sample. Did I mention the lovely shading on my paper?

In the following picture I have my Subzero swatch from a few days ago next to Yuletide. I can see Yuletide is leaning a bit towards green.

I’m now thinking Yuletide is closer to a teal color. I pull out my Diamine Aurora Borealis and Robert Oster Deep Sea swatches and compare the colors (base and underlying). I can see it’s in the similar range of colors.

There is still something unique about this ink. My brain is telling me there’s more than one underlying color. Besides green I also see some blue. I have to say my swatch card came out brilliantly with the ink dispersing in an unusual pattern.

I added too much water to my inky sketch and so the sheen migrated to the edge of my sketch. I can still see some greens and blues in my sketch.

Yuletide is a gorgeous dark teal ink color with some medium pink sheen. Depending on the lighting there is also has some green and blue underlying colors. I would definitely use this ink in my artwork and for journaling. Another color on my wish list.

Slap the side of my head moment: I’ve been using Yuletide in a few of my sketches. There was something very familiar about this color. Yes! Of course! I have another favorite ink color I’m currently using in my lovely Lamy 2000 called Devil’s Kitchen! Here’s another swatch comparison.

The only differences I can see is Yuletide has more sheen and is slightly lighter in color. Other than that both ink swatches look very close.

Ink: Diamine Yuletide (sheen)

Pens: Maiora Impronte OS Posilippo with Fine nib. Automatic pen.

Journal: GLP Creations with TRP (68gsm)

Paper: Grumbacher Mixed Media

Day #23: Wonderland

Inkvent Day #23: Diamine Wonderland

Wonderland is a bright orange standard ink color. Look at how clear this bottle is.

This bright ink shows some lovely shading on my Tomoe River Paper.

On my swatch card there is a beautiful underlying yellow color showing through.

Another gorgeous ink wash. All of the Diamine inks from this calendar has performed well as an ink wash.

So far, Wonderland is the brightest orange ink I have in my collection. It’s a standard ink with subtle shading and a bright yellow underlying color.

In the short amount of time I’ve been using this color, it has grown on me. To me this is a happy color and I can see using this ink in my artwork. It would be a lovely color to use in my writing journal as well. It would definitely stand out among my teal, blue, and purple ink paragraphs.

Ink: Diamine Wonderland (standard)

Pens: Glass dip pen. Automatic pen.

Journal: GLP Creations with Tomoe River Paper (68gsm)

Paper: Grumbacher Mixed Media

Day #22: Oh My! It’s Black Ivy!

Inkvent Day #22: Diamine Black Ivy

At first glance this ink label looks to be black. Upon further inspection, I can see a hint of green. The name matches the ink color.

In my writing sample, the ink is a very dark color with a bright red sheen. My swatch shows a bright green underlying color. Let’s take a look at this from a different angle.

Wow! I see a lot of red sheen!

So much sheen!

I decided to wait two days before doing another writing sample on different paper to see how the ink behaves. Hard to imagine, but more sheen shows up.

Writing sample on Cosmo Air Light paper
Another view of my writing sample on Cosmo Air Light paper

I can see some wonderful colors in this ink!

An amazing bold ink wash with bright red sheen around the edges.

Black Ivy is a dark green ink that shows up initially as a green-black ink color on my paper. As the ink dries the bright red sheen appears along with tiny hints of green. It brings to mind shading qualities where the darker ink becomes the red sheen and the lighter ink becomes the green color. When the ink comes into contact with water, that’s when a bright green color appears. In some areas the underlying ink color appears to lean towards turquoise. Amazing ink characteristics. Black Ivy is on my wish list.

Ink: Diamine Black Ivy (sheen)

Pens: Monteverde Innova Carbon Black Rainbow Trim with Omniflex nib. Automatic pen.

Journal: GLP Creations with TRP (68gsm)

Paper: Cosmo Air Light (2nd writing sample). Grumbacher Mixed Media.