Diplomat Excellence is an A+

A Diplomat pen appeared on my radar two years ago. I was mesmerized by the striking wave pattern and I knew the nib would be beautiful to write with. I remembered watching a Goulet video and there was a two minute segment on this pen. At the time I thought it was expensive for a steel nib pen and so I waited. A few months ago I received an email from Vanness advertising their Diplomat Gift sets on sale. Naturally, I looked at what was on sale and I was surprised to see the Wave Guilloche set at a really good price.

This Diplomat pen feels like it should be my grail fountain pen. The quality, the lovely workmanship and attention to detail, the weight, how it feels in my hand, how beautifully it writes, and I could go on and on about this lovely fountain pen.

When I first received this pen, I filled it with Diamine Storm. Five days later, I wrote until the converter was almost dry. From what I can remember, I’ve never done that before.

I quickly filled my Waves Guilloche with Diamine All the Best and continued to write several pages in my journal. Yes, there was a lot of joy while writing with this lovely pen and ink combination.

I rarely do this (not cleaning between refills), but felt the need to keep writing

I enjoy the 1/4 turn to remove the cap from the pen. It’s a gratifying feel to put the cap on and to remove it. Also, it helps to have this easy cap removal when I need to jot down my notes quickly.

This metal pen weighs around 43.75 grams with the included converter filled with ink.

The pen can be posted and it posts deeply on the body. I could write a full page in my journal before my hand gets a tiny bit tired. It also has to do with how I hold my pen. If I hold it closer towards the nib, I can feel some back weight issues. The further up and away from the nib, the pen (posted) feels comfortable and a bit more balanced.

The wavy silver stripes on the pen creates an unusual pattern of shimmer while I twirl my pen. When I use my loupe, I can see the engraved silver wavy pattern into the matte black (guilloche engraved). When I run my fingers over it, I just feel a subtle hint of smooth tiny ridges. It’s barely noticeable with the lacquer coating.

The pen has a spring loaded clip. A really, really nice feature and I like how this pens slips in and out of my pen case with the clip gliding smoothly over the elastic bands.

I could not resist a quick sketch of my lovely fountain pen.

Pen: Diplomat Excellence A+ Waves Guilloche with Fine nib

Ink: Diamine All the Best (Shimmer & Sheen)

Paper: Rhodia

Art Journal: Stillman & Birn Alpha A5

A Prismatic Diplomat Magnum

Note: After extensive use, I’ve added an update. See below. 😊

While I was looking at Goulet’s exclusive Lamy Vista Black, I was also taking a gander at their Diplomat Magnum offerings. The one that caught my eye was their Prismatic Purple color. This is a Goulet exclusive color in the US. I noticed on the box it came in it said “John Doe.” Apparently, that’s what it’s known as outside of the US.

My pen matches the Storm ink perfectly

Depending on the lighting, the pen could look purple:

or blue:

This is my fourth Diplomat fountain pen I own. The other three include the Traveller, Aero and the Excellence A+. Personally, the one thing that stands out about Diplomat’s pens is how well theirs nibs are tuned and they simply write beautifully. That’s all I need to say.

The Magnum would be considered a slightly skinny pen. The grip/section is kind of ergonomic where there are three thin flat surface areas which helps to keep my fingers in position with this skinny section. This grip is around 8.3mm. I typically enjoy writing with grips around 10-11mm range. I can already tell I won’t be writing for extended periods of time with this Magnum.

The only real issue I have with my pen is how hard it is to pull the cap off. I believe it’s because the pen is slim and with my joint issues, I have a hard time grasping the body to pull the cap off. It could also be with this particular pen I have, the cap fits tight.

This Goulet exclusive Magnum comes with a converter. The pen weighs around 14.50 grams with the included converter filled with ink. It takes short and long international standard ink cartridges.

When I screw the body back into the section, I keep turning until the body feels as though it twists into a lock position. It’s a very slight locking feel and one of the windows will line up with the top of the nib.

Speaking of windows, the Magnum has two ink windows or cut outs on opposite sides of the body. Helpful to see how much ink I have left in my converter or ink cartridge.

I know I will not be writing with this pen for extended periods of time, but it would work perfectly for creating my quick inky sketches. It’s a lightweight fountain pen with a snap cap, a clip on the cap, and fits nicely in my artsy pen case. Also, it’s prismatic and depending how I hold my pen in the light I’ll see blue or purple or maybe a little bit of both.

😊 Edit (06/30): My gut feeling told me to get two of these Magnum pens. Here is my second one with an Extra Fine nib. I have to say, I am enjoying my time writing with this pen. I filled my pen with a shimmering ink called Hayabusa. A lovely and bright purple ink with green sheen and copper-like shimmers. I’ve been happy with this pen & nib & ink combination.

I’ve learned to lighten my grip considerably on this thin pen. When I reach for it, my muscle memory kicks in and all is well. I do write with my pen posted and find it’s a better balance in my hand. I can now write paragraphs without any issues.

My Extra Fine nib is lovely. It’s smooth with some slight feedback. With the Hayabusa ink it appears to be a wet writer.

Pen: Diplomat Magnum Goulet Exclusive Prismatic Purple (John Doe) with Medium nib

Ink: Diamine Storm (Inkvent-shimmer)

Pen: Diplomat Magnum Goulet Exclusive Prismatic Purple (John Doe) with Extra Fine nib

Ink: Colorverse Hayabusa (glistening)

Paper: Rhodia