Green Kingfisher Green – Anderillium Inks

Green Kingfisher Green reminds me of a medium olive green color. I can see several underlying colors which include light dusty gold and bright cyan blue. I’m thinking there’s another color, but won’t know for sure until I sketch with this gorgeous ink color.

This is another ink color I had a hard time photographing. The olive green color is a tad bit lighter than what my writing sample shows. There is some shading that shows up while writing with my TWSBI GO with medium nib.

It was not too hard to find comparable inky colors from my collection. They each have their own personalities especially when using different papers. You can see how my swatching process has changed over the years.

Another look at my sketch along with my swatch card together.

I had to pull out my watercolor paint swatches to help identify that tan/beige color that kept appearing in my artwork.

My Thoughts:

As I sketch more with fountain pen inks, I’m finding certain colors appeal to me more than others. If I had to choose a green color, I would gravitate more towards the olive green color.

This ink leans more towards the wet side. It’s not gushing wet (like Van Dieman’s Inks), but it’s also not dry.

I am having too much fun with this lovely olive green ink. I might put off the next ink color for a few days so I can write my TWSBI GO dry. Hahaha!

I’m adding this ink color to my wish list. Yes, I know I have other olive green ink colors in my collection for writing. I would get this for sketching. It has some unique qualities.

Look at the explosion of colors that appear when I add water to the inky splat on my paper towel. The blue is close to a light cyan blue color.

The ink is still damp and I can see remnants of olive green around the edges
The ink is dry and the golden orange color appears

Pen Used: TWSBI Go with Medium nib

Ink: Anderillium Green Kingfisher Green

Journals Used: Canson Artist Series Mix Media. GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm Dot Grid. Stillman & Birn Alpha.

A Prismatic Diplomat Magnum

While I was looking at Goulet’s exclusive Lamy Vista Black, I was also taking a gander at their Diplomat Magnum offerings. The one that caught my eye was their Prismatic Purple color. This is a Goulet exclusive color in the US. I noticed on the box it came in it said “John Doe.” Apparently, that’s what it’s known as outside of the US.

My pen matches the Storm ink perfectly

Depending on the lighting, the pen could look purple:

or blue:

This is my fourth Diplomat fountain pen I own. The other three include the Traveller, Aero and the Excellence A+. Personally, the one thing that stands out about Diplomat’s pens is how well theirs nibs are tuned and they simply write beautifully. That’s all I need to say.

The Magnum would be considered a slightly skinny pen. The grip/section is kind of ergonomic where there are three thin flat surface areas which helps to keep my fingers in position with this skinny section. This grip is around 8.3mm. I typically enjoy writing with grips around 10-11mm range. I can already tell I won’t be writing for extended periods of time with this Magnum.

The only real issue I have with my pen is how hard it is to pull the cap off. I believe it’s because the pen is slim and with my joint issues, I have a hard time grasping the body to pull the cap off. It could also be with this particular pen I have, the cap fits tight.

This Goulet exclusive Magnum comes with a converter. The pen weighs around 14.50 grams with the included converter filled with ink. It takes short and long international standard ink cartridges.

When I screw the body back into the section, I keep turning until the body feels as though it twists into a lock position. It’s a very slight locking feel and one of the windows will line up with the top of the nib.

Speaking of windows, the Magnum has two ink windows or cut outs on opposite sides of the body. Helpful to see how much ink I have left in my converter or ink cartridge.

I know I will not be writing with this pen for extended periods of time, but it would work perfectly for creating my quick inky sketches. It’s a lightweight fountain pen with a snap cap, a clip on the cap, and fits nicely in my artsy pen case. Also, it’s prismatic and depending how I hold my pen in the light I’ll see blue or purple or maybe a little bit of both.

Pen: Diplomat Magnum Goulet Exclusive Prismatic Purple (John Doe) with Medium nib

Ink: Diamine Storm (Inkvent-shimmer)

Paper: Rhodia

Indigo Bunting Blue – Anderillium Inks

A few weeks ago, I thought I was missing a color from the Anderillium samples I received. I initially swatched 15 inky colors. I checked the packing slip and I counted 16 sample vials.

This morning I took out my sample vials and placed them on my desk for a quick photo op. I looked inside the supposedly empty box and found the missing vial of ink stuck in between some bubble wrap. I now feel as though all is good in my world and I can now proceed to chat about the inks.

I quickly did a swatch of this (supposedly missing) ink and immediately enjoyed seeing this dusty blue color. A very calm and enjoyable color.

I did a quick sketch to see how well the ink interacts with water. It’s gorgeous!

Before I get too far into this fun adventure, I have to come up with a plan on how to best present the Anderillium inks on my blog. I think I will do a quick sketch and then follow up with a writing sample. If this sounds familiar it’s because I did a similar process for the Diamine Inkvent Calendar.

This ink color dries a bit lighter than what my writing sample shows

This ink has some lovely shading and no sheen.

I’m sure it will be helpful to include other swatch colors I have for comparisons.

Looks like this will work. Short and sweet, right?

My Thoughts: After using this ink for two days, I find I’m using this color for sketching. It’s a decent color for writing, but after looking back on the paragraphs I wrote I do wish the ink was a tad bit darker. It’s a lovely wet ink with lovely shading.

Pen Used: TWSBI Go with Medium nib

Ink: Anderillium Indigo Bunting Blue

Journals Used: Canson Artist Series Mix Media. GLP Creations The Author TRP 68gsm Dot Grid. Stillman & Birn Alpha.

A New (to me) Fountain Pen Ink Brand – Anderillium Inks

I’m always searching for and coming across fountain pen inks that I can use for both writing and sketching in my journals. I was elated to have an opportunity to try out a new-to-me brand of inks. The samples arrived at my studio desk and I immediately began swatching the colors.

This new-to-me inks are made by Anderillium Inks and they are based in Tampa, Florida. Their inks are handcrafted and inspired by nature. They have two inky offerings: Cephalopod and Avian. It appears I’m missing a color. No worries. I found the missing vial hidden in the bubble wrap. I will swatch the missing color later.

Look at the bright colors!

The Anderillium inks are hand made in their own laboratory. They do not use any animal products in their inks or in their packaging. They are passionate about protecting our oceans and our wildlife. They choose to use the most sustainable and environmentally friendly materials whenever possible.

Their inks are water based and are made only with chemicals that are safe for the environment. I was so happy to read about their inks and their passion in protecting the ocean and wildlife.

Over the next few weeks, I will be spending some quality time (writing & sketching) with each of the ink colors I have on hand and provide some thoughts about the inks in general. In the meantime, I have written a few notes to myself so I wouldn’t forget my initial thoughts. I will do my best to describe the color(s) I see and any inky qualities that stand out.

As I was flipping through the swatches I created, I found a few of the Anderillium ink colors unique enough to add to my wish list. There were also a few colors that appeared to be somewhat close to some of the colors I have in my inky collection.

My inky collection of fountain pen inks

I am looking forward to this fun adventure. Stay tuned.

Thank you Frank from Federalist Pens and Paper for providing the ink samples.

Inks: Anderillium Inks

Swatches: Col-o-ring Cards

Paper: Rhodia

On a Lamy Adventure

This month appears to be my Lamy month for writing and sketching. Right now I have a few Lamy pens inked in nib sizes Fine, Medium, and Stub 1.1. While I enjoy writing with my Fine nib, I do find I’m spending more time with my Stub nib. The line variations are not dramatic, but subtle and I like that my handwriting style has a bit of flair.

I’ve mentioned a few times before, I use my TWSBI GOs for sketching and I rarely use them for writing. Probably because they are chunky pens. My Lamy’s are comfortable in my hand for extended periods of writing time. I now include them in my sketching kit. I enjoy my pens more when I can use them for both writing and sketching. Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoy my GOs as they are very durable and hold quite a bit of ink and of course easy to clean.

I was watching a Goulet video when they introduced their special edition Lamy Vista Black. It’s the first time that Lamy has worked with a retailer in the US to produce an exclusive fountain pen. There are a few unique features with this pen that are different than the regular available Vista. First, the included converter is black. Notice I highlighted the word included. I checked a few sites and the regular Vista does not include a converter. With this SE version, they included a black ink cartridge instead of their standard blue cartridge.

The clip trim is black PVD coating. The nib that comes with the pen is a black steel nib. My Medium nib is a lovely and smooth writing experience. My Lamy Vista weighs in around 20 grams with the included converter filled with ink.

All of my low-end Lamy fountain pens are the AL Star and LX models. This Vista is my first plastic like pen from Lamy. The edges on the body of the Vista feels a tiny bit sharper and a bit more pronounced than my AL Star pens. I like the demonstrator look of this pen. I can see the shimmers settling around the feed.

For the past three years, I’ve learned to appreciate my Lamy pens. A big plus for me is the ability to swap around their nibs. It doesn’t hurt that they come in various pen colors that I can easily match with my ink colors. I like the large metal pen clips and of course the snap cap capability.

I’m looking forward to swapping my Medium nib for the black Lamy Cursive nib. Now, to keep on writing.

Pen: Lamy Vista Black SE (Goulet) with Medium nib

Ink: Jacques Herbin Shogun

Paper: Rhodia

My Lamy Gift Set

In my last post, I had my Lamy Marron filled with my lovely black ink called Shogun. I thought I would do a blog post about this special gift set I received.

This set included a lovely A5 hardbound journal with a beautiful rose gold geometric pattern. For this post, I will do a quick review of each product.

My Lamy Journal

I hate to admit this, but I only spent a few seconds checking out my new pen. I immediately gravitated towards my new journal to check out the lovely pages. I did some research and read the paper is acid free, bleed proof, and fountain pen ink friendly. It has two bookmark ribbons in black and bright neon green. It has 192 pages. The last eight pages in the journal have perforations to allow you to remove the sheets. There’s an elastic pen loop and a pocket in the back of the journal. The paper weight is around 92gsm. There is also an elastic closure to secure your closed journal.

After I opened my new journal I was surprised to see the lined paper. Yes, this is my first Lamy journal. From what I read on Lamy’s site, this paper is unique for those wishing to preserve personal notes in the form of handwriting.

The unique lines in this journal are interesting and would make a lovely practice journal for handwriting.

Before I start writing in a new journal, I always create an inky test page on the last two pages in the journal. That serves two purpose. First, I like to keep track of what inks I use in the journal and also see if there is any ghosting or bleed through. Second, after writing my first entry on my inky test page, the journal is no longer new and I can start journaling or sketching. I know, it’s a mind game I play with myself, but it does help me overcome the blank pages staring back at me. Hahaha!

From my inky test page, I do notice some bleed through on the backside of the page. Mostly it came from writing with my stub nib pens like my Pilot 742 SU and my TWSBI Swipe Stub 1.1. I can also see a few dots where my nib lingered a bit longer on the paper and showed up on the other side. So much for bleed proof paper.

With the paper having the unique lines, I was more conscious about the way I wrote in my journal. I took my time writing and in the end my handwriting turned out consistent and legible.

The only issue I have with this journal is the problematic bleed through. Maybe I’m suppose to use a Lamy with an extra fine nib with this journal. If anyone has a similar or different experience with this journal paper, let me know.

My Lamy LX Marron with Fine nib

Okay, back to my Lamy pen. The pen is made from lightweight aluminum with an anodized finish. The Marron color is a lovely dark brown color with bronze accents/trims. It’s a beautiful pen. What makes the LX model different than the AL Star model is the trim and the nib. On the top of the cap it’s the same trim color used in the clip and it looks like shiny metal.

The Lamy LX pen has a glossy black PVD nib with laser engraved Lamy name and nib size. The section is a bit more transparent than the AL Star model.

I’m finding the Lamy nibs work perfectly with shimmering inks.

This Lamy pen is a snap cap which makes it a perfect art tool to use in creating my artwork.

My Lamy came with a blue ink cartridge. A converter has to be purchased separately. Luckily I keep a few spares on hand.

Pen: Lamy LX Marron with Fine nib

Ink: Jacques Herbin Shogun

Journal: Lamy A5 hardbound with rose gold geometric pattern

My First Bottle of Black Ink (Dye Based)

I can’t say how many bottles of ink I have in my collection. I’ve lost track at number 130-something. I have a few boutique ink brands that I had to try out like Birmingham and Franklin-Christoph. I have my go to brands like Diamine, Robert Oster, Van Dieman’s Inks, and Jacques Herbin.

I noticed I was lacking a basic black ink color. I do have a bottle of the Platinum Carbon ink, but that is a pigmented/permanent ink that I use primarily for sketching.

I recently purchased my first bottle of black (dye based) ink and it happens to have two beautiful shimmering particles.

Here is my lovely Jacques Herbin 1670 Shogun by Kenzo Takada & E3. They call this a twilight-colored ink which represents a beautiful night of stars and is coated with red and gold shimmering particulates.

This black ink is gorgeous in person. In normal lighting and looking at my writing sample straight on, this ink looks like an average black color.

Upon further inspection and looking from a different angle I can see the red shimmers. To me it looks pink in normal light, but when I take it outside the red definitely pops on my paper along with the gold shimmers.

I never thought I would be excited about a black ink color.

To me, it’s a subtle black ink. I’ve seen a few folks comment that it’s dark brown. From my swatch and writing sample, I do not see any brown at all. This ink has a lovely flow in my Lamy pen. The sparkles are subtle and beautiful at the same time.

I’ve been writing for a bit and the shimmers still appear in every line I write.

Pen: Lamy LX Marron with Fine nib

Ink: Jacques Herbin 1670 Shogun by Kenzo Takada

Paper: Rhodia

Journal: Stalogy 365 Editor’s Series

A Lamy Cursive Nib

A few weeks back, I saw on my media feed something about a new Lamy nib arriving. Naturally, I went to investigate what all this chatter was about.

I must say that when I first saw this nib, I thought to myself this was one beautiful and unusual nib. Who could not resist the laser engraved writing on this nib. Most importantly check out the the nib’s unique design.

It’s a black PVD coated steel nib. They are hand shaped and perfectly aligned.

I’ve read this new replacement nib was designed for writing Chinese and Japanese “running script” cursive. The lines it creates is between a Lamy Fine and Extra Fine nibs. Personally, I feel it leans more towards a Lamy Fine nib. I’ll need to write with this nib a bit more and see if my statement is correct. The horizontal strokes are suppose to be a bit wider than the vertical strokes. They definitely are as you can see in my writing sample.

This new Lamy replacement nib came at a perfect time for me. I’ve been bringing my Lamy’s back into my pen rotation and I’ve been enjoying my time with them especially in creating my pen & ink artwork.

Pen: Lamy AL Star Black with Lamy Cursive nib

Ink: Diamine Blue Pearl (shimmering)

Paper: Rhodia

Sketching Around Me

This morning, I gathered a few of my fountain pens and my sketch journal and placed them in my messenger bag. I ended up at a coffee shop I’ve been meaning to visit and never had a chance to stop in. It turned out to be one of the best coffee shop and sketching experience I’ve encountered.

Inside the shop I saw lots of open space with plenty of tables and chairs. Lots of folks wandered in and out of the shop and grabbed their coffees to go. A few folks, who sat towards the back of the shop, were busy working on their laptops. I was receiving positive vibes here.

I sat at a table in the middle of the coffee shop and started sketching what was immediately in front of me: my cup of coffee and my sugary treat. Then I looked around and saw the display cabinet at the back of the shop. There were colorful cups and bags of coffee on display. I felt a challenge hit me and I started sketching the back wall.

When I stopped to see my progress, I felt there was something missing in my sketch. I looked around and saw a vase with some blue and yellow flowers on the counter and I thought adding a floral scene would be a perfect way to finish my sketch.

I’ve been seeing lots of self improvements over the last few weeks. I am no longer hiding at the back table and sketching. My art supplies are spread out across the table for everyone to see. I’m becoming more efficient with my observations and sketching less which results in less lines to erase. It could be I’m getting better at memorizing what I see. Also, I find myself smiling more while I’m creating my artwork.

Pens used: TWSBI GOs with Stub 1.1 nibs. Pilot Prera with CM nib. Faber-Castell Hexo with Medium nib. Lamy Al Star with Cursive nib. Copic Multiliner with 0.1mm tip (permanent ink).

Inks: Van Dieman’s Ink Morning Frost and Hail Storm. Robert Oster Heart of Gold, Melon Tea, and Thunderstorm. Diamine Pink Glitz, Golden Ivy, Enchanted Ocean, Seize the Night, and All the Best.

Journal: Stillman & Birn Alpha Softbound A5